Friday, October 26, 2007

Wandering, Wondering, and Blundering into the Mystery

The very word “man” implies “God,” the very word “relative” implies “Absolute.” --F. Schuon

To know what man can be is to know that God is, which in turn leads to an understanding of what to do about the situation, i.e., meditation, prayer, the cultivation of virtue, and wandering about aimlessly but not omlessly in the desert, each of which is a different mode of faith and worship. In this regard, "Faith is like an ‘existential’ intuition of its ‘intellectual’ object" (Schuon), the pre-conception required to give birth to the seed of God.

First of all, you needn't waste any time trying to prove whether God exists, because man is the evidence you seek, if only you would seek and discover the Real Man behind the mask. It is like leaves trying to prove -- or disprove, as the case may be -- the existence of trees by growing more leaves. Once you walk the plank into God's arbor and your wood beleaf, the coonundrum ends and the Great Mystery begins. And it is a "mystery in motion," otherwise known as an adventure -- the only one that really Is and has ever been: the adventure of consciousness. The melody of your life continues to play, only transposed to a higher key.

Now "mystery," like "worship," is a misunderstood word. Just as "worship" -- or what we were calling (w) -- is the cultivation of an (L) and therefore (K) link between God and man -- or O and (¶) -- mystery is not an absence of knowledge, but a pregnant space where a certain kind of knowledge flows. But to distinguish this from profane, horizontal knowledge (k), we call this latter form (n).

As a brief aside, I feel sorry for anyone who is not able to plunge heart first into the adventure of consciousness and abide in the Great Mystery that is. Having lived in both worlds, I would never return to being a sleepwalking clockjockey down in 4D. To be honest, I never really was. Rather, I made a solemn vow way back in high school that I would never join the conspiracy to rob me of my own slack -- a loss which cannot be quantified because timelessness cannot be measured. Suffice it to say that it is of infinite worth to a man who cares about his spiritual development and the fate of his soul.

I think I was probably a born "pneumatic," as Schuon calls it (although Petey might take issue with this). I can't think of any better explanation. There are just certain people for whom it requires little effort to see that the spiritual world is more real than the conspiracy world, and that the game isn't worth the condle in the latter swindle. Schuon writes that "The pneumatic is a man who identifies a priori with his spiritual substance and thus always remains faithful to himself; he is not a mask unaware of his scope, as is the man enclosed in accidentality."

I don't want to romanticize my past, because it hasn't always been easy being, er, different. One of the reasons is that when the typical neurotic person notices -- but doesn't yet gnotice -- that he is different from the Others, he usually blames himself and tries to conform to the group, thus sacrificing his individuality and aborting the adventure of consciousness (since it is only the individual that can take this trip; there is no group rate). It took quite a while to simply let my freak flag fly without feeling self-conscious about it. To be honest, it was probably only after I started blogging that I really "pulled out all the stops," so to speak.

I mean, even in writing the book, you can see that I "pulled back" from where I am now. This is because when I wrote it, I wasn't sure if there were any other Raccoons out there -- you know, freevangelical pundamentalists, vertical theocons, and neotraditional cosmonauts. Therefore, as odd as the book is, I still had to make some concessions to the conspiracy, since I hadn't yet started the coonspiracy. But now, with the blogging, I don't care. I now have a small audience of Raccoons scurrying about in my head, which is what has stimulated my creativity and allowed me to blog every day.

I'm probably going to get sidetracked here, but this is important. The other day I was reading a talk by Joseph Campbell, about how he took the extreme measure of checking out of the conspiracy back in his day, which in turn became the interior touchstone of his life, since it allowed him to contact his true self and then live from his center from that point onward.

It's really a pretty remarkable story, and I imagine that most Raccoons will relate to it, even if they reject some of Campbell's later new age noodling. He attended Princeton in the mid-1920s, and could have easily taken the traditional path to graduate school and then academia. But during a visit to Europe in 1927-28, he came into contact with all the new trends that were going on at the time -- Jung, Joyce, modern art, etc. -- so that when he returned, he had lost all interest in what academia had to offer:

".... So I said to hell with it. I went up into the woods and spent five years reading.... It was from 1929 to 1934, five years. I went up to a little shack in Woodstock, New York, and just dug in. All I did was read, read, read, and take notes. It was during the Great Depression. I didn't have any money...."

Importantly, this wasn't just aimless reading, but what someone else once called the "mystery school of individuation." Perhaps you're familiar with the concept. You find one book that speaks directly to your soul, which tips you to another one that does the same. Pretty soon you're embarked on a wild nous chase, not for any "exterior" purpose, but for the purpose of trying to articulate the idiom of your own soul. The end result -- among other things -- is that 1) you know you have a soul, 2) you are aware that your soul is very specifically yours (i.e., it has its own divine clueprint, so to speak), and 3) you don't want to do anything in life that would interfere with the intrinsic joy of living from your soul.

But it takes a lot of courage and persistence to do this: "Actually, there were times when I almost thought -- almost thought -- 'Jeez, I wish someone would tell me what I had to do,' that kind of thing. Freedom involves making decisions, and each decision is a destiny decision. It's very difficult to find in the outside world something that matches what the system inside you is yearning for. My feeling now is that I had a perfect life: what I needed came along just when I needed it. What I needed was life without a job for five years. It was fundamental."

Because he was detached from the conspiracy, Campbell was able to take advantage of the more subtle currents that course through the arteries of the Cosmos: "... there's the idea of bumping into experience and people while you're wandering. You really are experiencing life that way. Nothing is routine, nothing is taken for granted. Everything is standing out on its own, because everything is a possibility, everything is a clue, everything is talking to you.... You are in for wonderful moments when you [live] like that -- for example, my putting up my hand in the Carmel library and finding a book that became a destiny book.... That rambling is a chance to sniff things out and somehow get a sense of where you feel you can settle." (This reminds me of the rabbinic saying that God spends most of his time arranging meetings and marriages.)

I feel sorry for young men and women today who go straight from high school to the university idiot factory and then on to some slackless job, slaving away for the conspiracy. They're missing out on the experience of a lifetime, which is to say, the writing of their own unique lifetome -- which only the individual soul can compose.

I can relate to Campbell's story, because in my case I quit college in my junior year (before they could expel me), and spent the next five or six years wandering, but not idly. Rather, it was a period of intense non-doodling, as if my soul were on fire and I was looking for water. By the time I entered graduate school in 1982, I was an utterly different person than I would have been had I spent all those years in the idiot factory. In short, I never would have become me. Whether it was luck or destiny, I cannot say.

But for the "pneumatic personality" -- which I imagine describes most Raccoons -- "he is born with a state of knowledge which, for other people, would actually be the goal, and not the point of departure; the pneumatic does not 'go forward' towards something 'other than himself'; he stays where he is in order to become fully what he himself is -- namely his archetype -- by ridding himself, one after the other, of veils or outer surfaces, shackles imposed by the ambience or perhaps by heredity. He becomes rid of them by means of ritual supports -- 'sacraments,' one might say -- not forgetting meditation and prayer."

Now back to our irregularly unscheduled program. Schuon agrees that mystery is not an absence of knowledge but the presence of a certain kind of profound knowledge; for it "is the essence of truth which cannot be adequately conveyed through language -- the vehicle of discursive thought -- but which may suddenly be made plain in an illuminating flash through a symbol, such as a key word, a mystic sound, or an image whose suggestive action may be scarcely graspable." Elsewhere he states that "Mystery is as it were the inner infinity of certitude, the latter could never exhaust the former."

Again, it is far from being something vague or fuzzy: "By ‘mystery’ we do not mean something incomprehensible in principle -- unless it be on the purely rational level -- but something which opens on to the Infinite, or which is envisaged in this respect, so that intelligibility becomes limitless and humanly inexhaustible. A mystery is always ‘something of God.’"

Let go into the mystery
Let yourself go

There's a way and a mystic road
You've got to have some faith
To carry on....

You've got to dance and sing
And be alive in the mystery
And be joyous and give thanks
And let yourself go
--Van Morrison, The Mystery

46 Comments:

Blogger Ricky Raccoon said...

Myths, symbols – they are the only way I think to make sense of the world.
Great post, Bob. Thanks.

10/26/2007 09:50:00 AM  
Blogger James said...

I don't want to romanticize my past, because it hasn't always been easy being, er, different. One of the reasons is that when the typical neurotic person notices -- but doesn't yet gnotice -- that he is different from the Others, he usually blames himself and tries to conform to the group, thus sacrificing his individuality and aborting the adventure of consciousness (since it is only the individual that can take this trip). It took quite a while to simply let my freak flag fly without feeling self-conscious about it. To be honest, it was probably only after I started blogging that I really "pulled out all the stops," so to speak.

Bob,

Thanks for that. I realize now that I have been aborting my adventure by trying to conform. No wonder I'm unhappy. You post today was a dosey. I literally had to get up from my desk and walk away, three times, before I finished reading it. It was almost too much profoundness at once. Thanks for being in tune.

10/26/2007 10:33:00 AM  
Blogger Coonified said...

"pneumatic"

Do you think that pneumatics are high maintainence babies, since they're indentified "a priori with spiritual substance," but yet grown within an environment that is not? It would be like descending into the world of titians and almost blind impersonal elemental forces, a life where spiritual battle takes on a more serious tone.

If so, many pneumatics probably have so much weight that it takes half a life time just to integrate themselves into the world. Some probably never get that far, and could explain alot of neuroses and phychoses.

"I feel sorry for young men and women today who go straight from high school to the university idiot factory and then on to some slackless job, slaving away for the conspiracy."

I hardly do feel sorry for them. Most of them are walking arrogence and pride, thinking that they know, but never gnowing. Alot of it's weakness I think, and if so, it would seem that weakness would seek out strength in order to learn from it. But most just seek out strength to steal from it. That's why I don't feel sorry for most.

10/26/2007 10:37:00 AM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

Coonified; I think that being pneumatic simply means that one is 'inherently spiritually minded.' This tells us remarkably little (And yet quite much) about that person. I was such; I always knew truth though in my teen years I avoided it with a passion. Seraphim Rose said he sought truth and could not find it. I had been found by truth long ago but refused it.

I was a quiet, contemplative baby, they tell me.

10/26/2007 10:48:00 AM  
Blogger walt said...

Not being familiar with the word 'pneumatic,' I looked it up. I see there are both vertical and horizontal meanings for this word!

For all the serious trauma of the fires in your area, there must have been an interior reflection of 'heat' this week, because each post has been full of exceptional in-sights. To have subjects like "worship" and "mystery" moved to front has been a treat!

You were discussing Campbell's experiences and the "mystery school of individuation" in general:

"...there's the idea of bumping into experience and and people while you're wandering. You really are experiencing life that way. Nothing is routine, nothing is taken for granted. Everything is standing out on its own, because everything is a possibility, everything is a clue, everything is talking to you."

Tibetan Buddhists refer to this experience as the Sign Lineage, where one follows a Path that is revealed as it is tread by "messages" from the environment.

The idea was put on film as a modern theme here, although the character embodying it was presented, naturally, as "insane."

I'm agreed with Ricky: great post!

10/26/2007 10:49:00 AM  
Blogger walt said...

Oh, and I suppose that if your audience of scurrying Raccoons agree with your allusion to "the conspiracy," we'll become known as One Cosmos Truthers!

10/26/2007 10:56:00 AM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

I guess the anti-Slack Conspiracy has been on my mind, since I've been reading the latest revelation from the Church of the Subgenius. Other names for conspiracy dupes, AKA, "the normals":

Yoke Wearer
Planet Warmer
TV Monkey
DNA Host
Blueneck
Spirit Junk
Skinner Mouse
Serial Number
MicroSoul
All-Static Brain-Wave Station
Ward of the Con

10/26/2007 11:28:00 AM  
Blogger Robin Starfish said...

Home run post today, rockies my sox. Succulent manna for us strangers in a strange land.

Adventure
fragile fingerholds
on the way to golden lake
trust the solid rock

10/26/2007 12:21:00 PM  
Blogger Coonified said...

River said:

"I think that being pneumatic simply means that one is 'inherently spiritually minded.'"

which is exactly what

identification "a priori with spiritual substance,"means. Or in other words embodiment with abnormal constitution, temperment, or whatever.

Just questioning how this abonormal constitution gets along with the world that's not identified "a priori with spiritual substance," since pneumatics don't necessarily come from pneumatic parents.

I think, no, I know I understand. Anyway, it was just a thought.

10/26/2007 12:23:00 PM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Bob - Forgive me, but your opening statement, "To know what man can be is to know what God is...", makes me a little uneasy - in that some hearing it might get the wrong idea. There is a modern day religious movement that literally believes the following:

As man is, God once was.
As God is, man may become.

Christian orthodoxy recognizes this as heresy. The created can never equal or become the Creator. We can, however, become a more and more accurate reflection of His image.

Again, forgive me if I'm only addressing my own paranoia (but someone has to). As usual, I am prepared to be put in my place (slinks off).

10/26/2007 12:24:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

How about to know that God is?

10/26/2007 12:35:00 PM  
Blogger Jack said...

I can't explain it...but something about today's post just struck a chord (I think it was a E7#9 chord, btw, for those keeping score). "The Mystery School of Individuation"!!!

Slacklightenment!

Okay, back to the cubicle for me...

10/26/2007 12:43:00 PM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Leave it to me to get all pissy over a typo. Sheesh.

;.]

"They're missing out on the experience of a lifetime, which is to say, the writing of their own unique lifetome -- which only the individual soul can compose." I immediately visualized God dipping paintbrushes in multi-colored paint and then letting them go. The brushes then become self-animated as they dance away, filing in their own canvasses. I know, a little dizzney of me.

10/26/2007 12:59:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

It wasn't a typo -- I changed it. You made a good point. One must be very precise in matters of the Eternal Doctrine....

10/26/2007 01:30:00 PM  
Anonymous nahuatl said...

Bob wrote:

"I think I was probably a born "pneumatic," as Schuon calls it (although Petey might take issue with this)."

Heh heh. Read Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and try to say that with a straight face.

10/26/2007 01:41:00 PM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Oh yeah - and the paintbrushes are mov'n and groov'n to "Astral Weeks". Nice Van.

10/26/2007 01:59:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"Once you walk the plank into God's arbor and your wood beleaf, the coonundrum ends and the Great Mystery begins. And it is a "mystery in motion," otherwise known as an adventure -- the only one that really Is and has ever been: the adventure of consciousness. The melody of your life continues to play, only transposed to a higher key."

Quite a seern'ade there, Bob!
It's not just a job it's an adventure, although to those who deny the Great Mystery, it wouls appear to be a madventure.

10/26/2007 02:23:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"...mystery is not an absence of knowledge, but a pregnant space where a certain kind of knowledge flows."

Only a Bobsetrician could describe it in such a concise, beautiful way!

10/26/2007 02:26:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"It took quite a while to simply let my freak flag fly without feeling self-conscious about it. To be honest, it was probably only after I started blogging that I really "pulled out all the stops," so to speak."

Super freak! Super freak! Super freaky! Sorry, couldn't... resist.

10/26/2007 02:32:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"walt said...
Oh, and I suppose that if your audience of scurrying Raccoons agree with your allusion to "the conspiracy," we'll become known as One Cosmos Truthers!"

Howzabout the One Cosmos Super Freaky Sleuthers?
Great name for a band of brothers (and sistas) under the pelt!

10/26/2007 02:35:00 PM  
Blogger walt said...

A little while ago, you said to Nomo:
"One must be very precise in matters of the Eternal Doctrine...."

Okay.... So in this morning's post you wrote:
"Once you walk the plank into God's arbor and your wood beleaf, the coonundrum ends and the Great Mystery begins. And it is a "mystery in motion," otherwise known as an adventure -- the only one that really Is and has ever been: the adventure of consciousness. The melody of your life continues to play, only transposed to a higher key."

I was thinking as I read that, how precise it seemed to me. Not poetic or rhetorical (to me), but as you say, exactly so.

This is the One Cosmos Effect(TM),
wherein words contain more meaning than "the minimum."

So much of spiritual yearning and likely all of self-effort (jiriki) is the wish to be "transposed to a higher key."

10/26/2007 02:35:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"This is because when I wrote it, I wasn't sure if there were any other Raccoons out there -- you know, freevangelical pundamentalists, vertical theocons, and neotraditional cosmonauts."

Ha ha! Gack! My monitor is wearing java and my wife thinks I've lost it. Which I have, in a sense.
I told her "you had to be there."

It's like tryin' to explain why a great cOmedian is funny. If you're not in the audience it's difficult to realize second-hand. :^)

10/26/2007 02:42:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"Pretty soon you're embarked on a wild nous chase, not for any "exterior" purpose, but for the purpose of trying to articulate the idiom of your own soul."

Nothin' compares to the heavenly taste of the wild nous!
I've been gnowing on wild nouses all mornin' and I gotta say it's much better than lickin' toads.
More than a feeling, as I heard someone say.

10/26/2007 02:48:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

"Mystery is as it were the inner infinity of certitude, the latter could never exhaust the former."

Which is good news indeed, because if Mystery...if God, was finite, then how boring and pointless life would be.

10/26/2007 03:18:00 PM  
Blogger Ricky Raccoon said...

Walt,
Schuon’s writing is just that. Precision.

10/26/2007 08:07:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Nomo, I have read this blog off and on and I keep thinking Bob is getting there, the focus is coming. Just as he does I see a few people, you perhaps, getting a bit queasy about what he is saying.

All I can say is, Bob, you can do it!

10/26/2007 08:57:00 PM  
Blogger Ricky Raccoon said...

An on,
Maybe you missed the focus in between the off an on.

10/26/2007 09:17:00 PM  
Blogger Ricky Raccoon said...

“My feeling now is that I had a perfect life: what I needed came along just when I needed it.”

and

“I think I was probably a born "pneumatic," as Schuon calls it (although Petey might take issue with this). I can't think of any better explanation.”

Tomberg has this to say. Maybe it applies:

“…the gradual conversion that happens almost naturally in the course of advancing age…a certain transformation of the past takes place…it no longer appears merely as a factual memory…but idealized…what was haphazard, superficial, and insignificant is greatly outshone by the essential, deeper, and more meaningful aspects of life’s destiny, human kindness and wisdom…an aged person engaged in devotedly reevaluating the past in the light of heavenly illumination…”

and

“…the same light; the child still has his eyes full of heavenly light…with a future-oriented impulse.”

10/26/2007 09:20:00 PM  
Blogger Tea N. Crumpet said...

Just dropped in to the Bobservatory for the first time while procrastinating from doing my schoolwork. ;-) Fascinating post. I'll have to bring this up at dinner sometime with the kids and let my husband run with it!

My mind is numb from too much studying, if that is possible.

10/26/2007 09:25:00 PM  
Blogger Steve said...

there are more racoons than you know!

10/26/2007 11:05:00 PM  
Blogger Sal said...

Do you think that pneumatics are high maintainence babies, since they're indentified "a priori with spiritual substance," but yet grown within an environment that is not?

coonified,

High maintenance kids, perhaps. Infants are that way for different reasons. Children because they're acting on the personality they're born with. I was an easy, sunny baby but an odd, quirky kid. My eldest was the same way.

I would think, like most things, it depends. My own parents reactions were "We love you dearly, but we don't understand why you're not like everyone else and we worry about you. What will become of you? How are you going to get along in the world?"

A lot of well-intentioned energy was spent trying to teach me to conform. It worked up to a point.
As they themselves aged- and were no longer responsible for all of us- they experienced that self-exam and freeing up of the real self Bob and others talk about.

Different parents- the kind who can't accept variation in any form and crush it out brutally- different outcome.

10/27/2007 06:16:00 AM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Anon 8:57PM - It would be worth your while to pay closer attention.

10/27/2007 07:38:00 AM  
Blogger Van said...

What with a combined sleep hour total of 8hrs for the week and a substantial lack of slack, I won't try to coax my grey matter into making sense other than to say excellent posts this week (some great comments too), helped keep me going.

Oh, and Ximeze, the D'Souza vs Hitchens dust is on BookTV tonight at 7:00 est.

10/27/2007 01:32:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

"...the D'Souza vs Hitchens dust is on ..."

dust UP... Dust UP!

See what I'm dealing with here?

Anyone want to buy some used brain cells cheap?

10/27/2007 01:34:00 PM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Van - I'd take some of your
"pre-owned" brain cells anyday - and be better off for it!

10/27/2007 03:50:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

Holy Crap! TONGAN's in the Audience! Question to Hitchens "Before Christianity, Tonga, Fiji - eat people. What you offer different?"

The look on his face should have Hitchens fearing the wrong answer.

10/27/2007 06:14:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

So far neither real scores from either... note, if someone offers to come to your intellectual defense under the banner of Hume, as D'Souza did, to the effect of ("Hume proved that we can't scientifically prove that neurons and photons follow the same laws of physics here and in the next galaxy, so science is an act of faith"), abandon hope all ye who accept such aid.

Although Hitchens gave grudgingly that the only argument he can't fully denounce for Theism is the fact that we ARE here, and the universe supports us, so far it's sort of like two literalists flipping their coin and saying "SEE! It's a Heads Coin!" then "NO! See! It's a Tails Coin!".

10/27/2007 06:22:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

Thanks Nomo
;-)

10/27/2007 07:08:00 PM  
Blogger Coonified said...

Sal said...

"High maintenance kids, perhaps. Infants are that way for different reasons."

I was thinking more on the pre-verbal level and the empathetic love streams that are necessary for infants develope properly. And also, I wasn't being exclusive about it, as if there are no other reasons for things to go wrong; more of a categorical type of infant that in being identified with breath a priori would need empathy from the outside reflecting its own constitution, or else the psyche would kind of cave in on itself. Regression in other words.

I've just been studying Guntrips "schizoid phenomenia, object relations, and the self" lately, trying to figure myself out.

There's just no real obvious reason that I should have a deep structure problem like I do...unless the normal empathetic "life line" just wasn't enough to pull me into this world. It's as if I was born straight, but had to be bent wildly out of shape just fit; and now I'm returning to straightness. Elemental titans were a dream theme growing up, so I know it's that deep. They are conscious forces by the way.

Oh yea. Another thing that I've learned from Guntrip and deep deep psychology: The spiritual heights that we possess in this life are reciprical to how well infantile needs are met. So, the Christ and the perfect little baby Jesus are reflections of one another. As above so below. Most of you've already thought of this i'm sure. I think bob alludes to it in his book too. The infant is grown upon, like a foundation, rather than just not being there any more.

Thks for the feed back Sal!

10/27/2007 08:49:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

Coonified:

If you really want to read some cutting edge stuff on attachment and the brain, check out Allan Schore or his disciple Daniel Siegel. It's bearing out all of the early work by pioneers such as Guntrip, Fairbairn, Winnicott, et al.

10/27/2007 09:50:00 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

NoMo, I paid close enough attention. Bob is spooking you, touching on the edge of something that concerns you and makes you uneasy.

10/28/2007 05:42:00 AM  
Blogger Steve Chandler said...

Bob,

I have done the same Campbellquest---book leads to book leads to book---and that's why I believe Ken Wilber was brilliant in his "everybody's right" formulation when it comes to well-intentioned, goodhearted writing. Some people only get you part of the way there. Like Freud and even like Anthony Robbins....and I know you think he's a malignant narcissist, but for so many people h has given them a partial boost...even he admits now that he's missing a lot of the vertical...he talks longingly to Ken Wilber about how to access it...but he helps people get part way up. In my opinion. Even Chopra does, too. Although I agree with you that he's a moral idiot when he speaks on political matters. He truly is. But much of his work has helped people without hope to see that there IS vertical adventure available to them.

Book to book to book up and up the ladder; these people, in my opinion (include Colin Wilson and others here) are not to be dismissed as the enemy, or as caricatures. Surely they are not as whole as you (no sarcasm) and you were made by God a few lessons after he made Wilber. So you are about six books up from Wilber! However, without Robbins, Branden, Wilson etc...the lower, shallower, less complete helpers I never would have made it. Never would have made it to you.

For if someone had given me One Cosmos ten years ago I'd never have gotten through half of it. Now I'm on my third time through thanking you each time.

I think we can go into KOS mode by demonizing the incomplete people. I like Wilber's formulation that they are "right" as far as they go. Robbins is for the lazy extended adolescent you talk about....Tony gets them focused, collected and ready to get into action and create a successful adult life. It's a start. It's GOOD as far as it goes. Even he knows it doesn't go nearly far enough because it's all about YOU. But it's like cranking up the Stones Start Me Up.

Now: never stop. (You're a blessing.)

10/28/2007 06:37:00 AM  
Anonymous walmart shopper said...

Anon, do you think Bob's going to pull the rug from under those who are more orthodox in their approach?

10/28/2007 06:55:00 AM  
Blogger Ricky Raccoon said...

Steve,
Welcome. I should have said that with your earlier comment.

I agree with most of what you say. I had a similar experience in the early 90s with Covey’s book Seven Habits. I may not be here now, at this point, had I not been given that book by my dear uncle who passed away shortly after he gave it to me. It meant an awful lot to him when he gave it to me and I paid attention to that. With regard to reading previous to that time I was only interested in the classics, non-fiction adventure, etc.
That book I believe was the first one that made me look at working on me. But if there was any mention of spirituality in Covey’s book it didn’t interest me at the time.

So I agree with what you say about not rejecting those who are helped a little and maybe extent that to some of the things that come from blockheads that do the helping. They are bound to get some things right I suppose. But I haven’t read anything by Chopra or Robins and defer to Bob’s assessment.

The part I don’t agree with is that we may become like those Kosmoknotheads. We may look that way to them but there is no chance we will actually be like them. Those people have serious problems and no rules. I know you didn’t mean that exactly.

I agree with most as I said and add that anyone who is reading Bob’s book a third time in a thankful mode is a friend of mine.
Rick

10/28/2007 07:58:00 AM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Anon - Your words betray you. Your condescending tone towards Bob, "...I keep thinking Bob is getting there, the focus is coming...all I can say is, Bob, you can do it!" and your contempt for Christian orthodoxy as inferior to your "latter-day" religion makes it obvious that you are a ... go ahead, fill in the blank. I won't hold it against you, but I won't hesitate to tell you you're wack.

10/28/2007 11:03:00 AM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

I'd certainly hope not, Walmart Shopper. For Orthodoxy begins with 'O'.

10/29/2007 10:59:00 AM  

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