Friday, December 04, 2015

Coming to a Theater Near You, Your Life

In a comment, reader Magister suggests that life is analogous to a film, but to what is a film analogous?

Hey, I should know this because back off man, I was a film major. Yes, like the esteemed James Taranto I attended Cal State Northridge, the Harvard of the west San Fernando Valley. Except in my case I bothered to graduate. By which I mean they let me slide with a "gentleman's BA."

Why did I major in film? Because I couldn't think of an easier subject. Except for PE, and even I have more self-respect than that.

Turned out to be more difficult than I had imagined, but it goes to show that some things never change, in this case, my basic temperament. I've just never been able to take the Conspiracy seriously. Things it regards as important are malevolent or silly to me, whereas things I think are important are attacked or devalued -- if noticed at all -- by Big Con.

My whole life, at least from the age of nine or so, has been focussed on outwitting the Conspiracy. I've had some wins and some losses, but overall, I would say I've been able to preserve my sacred eccentricity and thus my Slack. So, open your Encirclopedia to page 261 and let's say it together:

Do the monkey bone, do the shingaling, get your slack back & take a trip, slip, lose your grip, & turn a backover flip and say: not the god of the philosophers, not the god of the scholars!

You know, like Pascal.

Back to the subject at hand: yes, your life is like a film. But what is the film really about? There are characters of course, conflicts, a crazy plot, and also a theme. What's yours? I already told you mine: Slack vs. Conspiracy. Everything else is a subset of that.

We've no doubt discussed this in the past, but I don't recall what I wrote, and besides, readers come and some even go, so it won't be a stale bobservation for one or two of you.

Volume One of Gnosis by slack hustler Boris Mouravieff has some helpful things to say. Indeed! I just opened the book to a random page and out popped this:

"... [S]omeone who has studied esoteric science can and must better understand the comedy of life, in which pretentious blind men lead other more modest blind men towards an abyss which will engulf both" (italics in original).

This is so true it tickles and hurts at the same time -- unless you just can't think of a Pretentious Blind Man who is leading our nation toward an abyss.

Now, the term "esoteric science" is a bit pretentious and bordering on the conspiratorial itself. For our counter-conspiratorial cult, the Cosmic Raccoons, "esoteric science" is just the way things really are. It's "esoteric" in the same sense that Bob is "abnormal" while actually being normal.

In other words, for the Raccoon, the most esoteric thing of all is a little common fucking sense.

Thus the false esoterism of the tenured, which is just more blindness from the pretentious -- systematic myopia masquerading as another -- and superior -- form of vision.

Real vision is of course 20/, which really means that the Raccoon can perceive the Infinite from any angle or distance, even its Fine Prince.

You might say that seeing the Infinite Abyss prevents us from falling into all the manmade ones.

Still, we must be cautious, as there are snares everywhere: "He who studies esoteric science must watch, and take care not to return once again to the crowd, nor, 'like everyone else,' to follow that broad way that leads to the abyss" (Mouravieff).

This is reminiscent of that fine prince's remark to the effect that He who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is not fit for service in the Kingdom of Slack.

Blah blah yada yada, time has seven dimensions, the last one being O, which is the Alpha and Omega: "It is not the void. It is the seed and end" of all that exists. It is source and destiny. You can't actually get out of it anyway -- that's a tip-toptical delusion, right? -- so you might as well be in it.

Put it this way. What we call "science" -- I mean the whole existentialada, not just this or that discipline -- tries to account for the whole of reality. You might say that it superimposes its vision over O, and does a pretty decent job of it, or at least metacosmically blind folks fall for it.

Nevertheless, there is always a gap between this and reality, and this gap is infinite. Or better, as Mouravieff terms it, there is a "zone of illusion" between us and reality, AKA O. Grace is here -- among other reasons -- to get us over that hump, i.e., to swim the moat.

In fact, here is where I differ with Mouravieff (and there are many such differences), because no amount of effort on our part can propel us over the void. To believe so is... the last temptation, as it were -- the sort of thing to which Jesus was tempted in the desert.

The Raccoon "takes the easy way out" by following the Law of Attraction instead of the Law of Force. But orthoparadoxically, it obviously takes a lot of effort to give up and trust God, no?

Another important orthoparadox is that what they call "civilization" is really a great wilderness, whereas genuine civilization is always out here in the bewilderness. For it is here where all the inaction -- the evolutionary non-doodling -- takes place. It is in this space of bewilderness -- unplugged from the conspiratorial grid -- that we may float upstream on wings of Slack, AKA grace.

The conspiracy loves its own. Therefore it hates us. But the tool's reproach is a kingly title, is it not?

I might add that the conspirator is in a cage, so he can't even really get at you. He needs you for food, but if you just ignore him he'll starve. Atheists, for example, need us. We don't need them, except maybe to toy with and sharpen our arguments and insultainments.

Ah, here's the part I was looking for: "between the limits drawn by birth and death" is a film representing "the life of each of us, all the beings we have met, and the ensemble of material and moral circumstances which surround us."

We watch -- or experience -- this film through a little slot we call the "present." Now, it seems that this present can't really be a part of the film per se.

Rather, it must somehow be outside or above it, right? Or at least more or less so. We all know people who are so immersed in their film that they are unable to stand back and see where it is going or what is the point of it all.

So, the Present has a kind of breadth and depth, does it not? And isn't the Conspiracy always trying to compress this slot and draw us into the agitation and drownian emotion of its urgent nihilocracy? That's the function of the liberal media, to force us to play roles in its low budget film-narrative.

Note that one is either in or out of this narrative. If you are in it, you are not permitted to be out.

Which is why a liberal, for example, is not permitted to watch Fox News, or not permitted to question global warming, or not permitted to doubt vulgar Darwinism.

But once outside the narrow slot of the Conspiracy, one awakens to the wider world -- the expansive cosmic bewilderness. It's so roomy here, who would want to leave?

To reiterate, the "essential aim" is to broaden "the individual slot that opens directly on the Present" (ibid.). Do that and you can read the Signs of the Times like a lesser man reads the clowns of the Times.

16 Comments:

Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

Good summary of the Conspiracy. (HT Happy Acres).

12/04/2015 09:38:00 AM  
Blogger Rick said...

"You can't actually get out of it anyway -- that's a tip-toptical delusion, right?"

This poked a thought: If God is Love (and He is) and Love (and love) by definition cannot coerce, does it stand to reason that our exile down here was perhaps (gulp) voluntary?

If not, then why, if I imagine this decision having taken place waybackwhen, does it feels sort of familiar (like watching or listening to some old movie while half asleep)?

12/04/2015 09:43:00 AM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

Mouravieff says this: "In his inmost heart lives a vague memory of the pure, unperverted consciousness [man] had before the fall.... Every normal and sane human being experiences, more than once, nostalgia for an uncorrupted life, and bitter regret that they are ensnared in the meshes of [sin]."

12/04/2015 09:44:00 AM  
Blogger Rick said...

Minus the sin, how similar is this in concept to Mary having been asked and then replying yes (and then the "birth" which took place later). Perhaps she was shown a little movie first (in a sense).
Anyway, she still said yes.

12/04/2015 09:55:00 AM  
Blogger Rick said...

Or rather, I Mary's case, the sin was "all around".

12/04/2015 09:57:00 AM  
Blogger mushroom said...

We are tiptoeing on the edge of George MacDonald territory when we start talking about being here voluntarily. Jesus was a volunteer.

12/04/2015 10:07:00 AM  
Blogger mushroom said...

We all know people who are so immersed in their film that they are unable to stand back and see where it is going or what is the point of it all.

If you ever seen the opening to "Deadwood", there is a horse running and this beautiful, powerful, free creature ends up being reflected in the water of a large mud puddle in the street. Despite the mud and filth underneath, the image is pristine and wonderful. That is some poetic film-making.

12/04/2015 10:20:00 AM  
Blogger Rick said...

Deadwood opening credits
Nice -- thanks, Mush.

12/04/2015 10:28:00 AM  
Blogger Rick said...

And that clip recalls this for similar reasons:

War Horse

WARNING difficult to watch

12/04/2015 10:34:00 AM  
Blogger julie said...

In other words, for the Raccoon, the most esoteric thing of all is a little common fucking sense.

I'll drink to that.

12/04/2015 01:39:00 PM  
Blogger julie said...

But orthoparadoxically, it obviously takes a lot of effort to give up and trust God, no?

O, indeed.

But once outside the narrow slot of the Conspiracy, one awakens to the wider world -- the expansive cosmic bewilderness. It's so roomy here, who would want to leave?

Amen.

12/04/2015 01:57:00 PM  
Blogger julie said...

Via Ace's overnight thread, beer yoga.

12/04/2015 07:55:00 PM  
Blogger julie said...

This is good: The Birth And Death Of Privacy: 3,000 Years of History Told Through 46 Images. Especially relevant to the idea that individuality as we know it is also a recent development. After all, how can anyone really be an individual when a desire for personal space is seen as deeply suspect? Also, interesting how Christianity was part of the reason people needed more privacy; I don't think I had ever encountered that idea before, but it does make sense.

12/05/2015 07:41:00 AM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

Important lessons in there for people who idealize the past, or who think they can project themselves into the past while remaining the same person.

The past isn't just a foreign country, it's a different planet.

12/06/2015 08:45:00 AM  
Blogger Van Harvey said...

Regarding the past, some people can say "We've moved past that", but for many others, the past is still somewhere far in their future.

Time travel. What a mess.

12/06/2015 10:23:00 AM  
Blogger John said...

"Important lessons in there for people who idealize the past, or who think they can project themselves into the past while remaining the same person."
Or, even a "sane" person.

12/06/2015 04:21:00 PM  

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