Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Seven Dimensional Analogue Photography

I see that much of this post may be obscure to those who haven't read the book of the sane gnome. I'm not trying to cloak my woolymindedness in an toxic haze of seductive mystagoguery, a la Deepak and the rest.

Rather, I'm pressed for time and have to run, so I can't necessarily flesh things out as much as I'd like. But I'm quite certain that at least one of you will understand what I'm talking about. Alternatively, you can think of the post as an unsaturated memo that you can use to arrive at your very own meme of O. (Also any gifted shutterbugs out there such as Robin may feel free to correct and clarify my metaphor and explain what I was actually trying to say.)

Continuing where we lifted off yesterday with Mouravieff's discussion of the additional dimensions of time, we spoke a few days ago of how the line of time pierces the plane of all-possibility and becomes realized in the now.

To put it another way, the now is not strictly speaking in time, but is actually a "portion (or prolongation) of eternity," so to speak. In this regard, Plato was quite correct in characterizing time as the moving image of eternity. I can't think of a more literal description.

This is why eternity is always -- and only -- accessible in the now, for the now is like an ever-present rabbit hole back to the Source. Your personal f-stop accounts for how much Light you allow into your aperture in any given moment. Obviously, the wider the aperture and the lower the f-stop, the more light.

But also bear in mind that this aperture is a two-way street, if you will forgive the mixed metaphor.

For example, if one is in the presence of a person with a particularly wide aperture (or low f-stop), one will be aware of the Light that emanates from him (just as he permits more Light into himself). This two-way camera eye is precisely what Eckhart was talking about when he said that "the eye with which I see God is the same eye with which God sees me." Like Plato, he was being quite literal. And Eckhart was a great photographer, to put it mildly.

In other words, there is only the one Eye, but everyone's personal camera is adjusted differently. Some have such a narrow aperture or fast f-stop that they might as well live in the dark, while others are so wide that they over-expose the world, which can result in actually devaluing it.

Was that clear? There are mystics, for example, who are exposed to so much Light that they can't take a good pneumagraph of this world, and therefore cannot appreciate its beauty and its value. f-stops are important. Too slow, and and you can only take pictures of God. And it's the same picture over and over, just a white blur.

A big part of the spiritual path involves slowing down one's shutter speed in order to allow more of the now in; which, practically speaking, is to dilate time -- and which is none other than Slack.

Moving right along, "As for the sixth dimension, this is the Time of the Universe; due to its volume it not only contains the possible, but the accomplishment of all the possibilities of each moment -- a complete cycle of all the lines of Time."

"Lastly, there exists a seventh dimension which is a dot; a dot situated at the same time in both Space and Time."

"Line of Time; Eternity; and All; these are the terms of our current language which correspond to the fourth, fifth, and sixth dimension. The term Zero corresponds to the seventh and last dimension, which should perhaps be considered as the pre-initial dimension."

I would prefer to say that the sixth and penultimate dimension is •, while the seventh is O. Put them together and you get ʘ, but we're getting ahead of ourselves.

Dot and circle. At first glance these would appear to be opposites, but upon deeper consideration you can see that the dot is simultaneously zero-dimensional and all-dimensional, in that an infinite number of lines may pass through it. Likewise, O can be thought of as possessing zero dimensions from within itself, as all things are simultaneously co-present within it.

Thus, to become ʘ means to establish a harmony between the dot and the sphere, so that the unthinkable plenum of O may deploy itself in time and be read out from moment to moment.

Note also what Mouravieff says about the Zero (O) being both the last dimension and the pre-initial one. This is why my book both begins and ends with that big fat nothing that is simultaneously everything. To us it is nothing unless we learn how to approach and assimilate it. Then it is everything; or, everything emanates and returns to it via the round-trip of the human station. God pours himself into the cosmos in general and human beings in particular, and our task, if you will, is to return the favor by returning each moment to its rightful Owner.

The notion of Zero plays a large role in esoteric philosophy. It is not the void. It is the seed and the end, the Alpha and Omega of all that exists. --Boris Mouravieff

Children are still so close to the Source, that it's difficult to miss the brightness. And they always give back more light than they receive:

24 Comments:

Blogger julie said...

When I grow up, I want to be Robin. Just when I think I'm starting to get the hang of this photography bizsness, he casually demonstrates how it's really done.

Anyway, back to reading...

4/13/2010 09:02:00 AM  
Blogger julie said...

In other words, there is only the one Eye, but everyone's personal camera is adjusted differently.

Indeed. Incidentally, this is why I found the "...of sound mind" comment from yesterday so hilarious. Clearly, in his case it's true, inasmuch as his F-stop is obviously fixed at such a high number, his eye is safe and sound from any inconvenient light leaking in.

4/13/2010 09:15:00 AM  
Blogger Northern Bandit said...

Wonderful!

One small clarification re the otherwise brilliant photography metaphor: a "fast" lens is one which permits a very wide aperture (i.e., a low f-stop). In the post you use the term "fast" to apply to a high f-stop (narrow aperture).

While nowhere near Robin's level of talent, I know enough to understand that one of the first lenses a serious amateur acquires is a "fast prime", usually a 50mm which can go as wide as 1.8 or better. These can be stopped down to f.4 or f.5 and still allow great shots in relatively low light. Shooting with almost any lens "wide open" causes image distortion of various kinds.

4/13/2010 10:27:00 AM  
Blogger f/zero said...

Heh, my first trip through OCUG was what inspired me to pick up my camera again after years on the shelf. It's a visual book (my favorite kind), a book about vision and from vision. If I can't see it I don't get it. So I can never thank you enough for the cool Ray-Bans, Bob.

The "moving image of eternity", "the eye with which I see God is the same eye with which God sees me" - such phrases are powerful creative fundamentals for a photographer. To discover that you're not merely looking at something is, well, eye-opening. It makes all the difference.

Photography's holy trinity - aperture (f/stop), exposure (shutter speed), and ISO (base film speed) - is indeed the metaphor for my own spiritual adventure. They all must work together - adjusting one will require some sort of sacrifice to one or both of the others. It's necessary to think about what you want; if you expect lots of light, be prepared to experience it in very short bursts. If on the other hand you prefer to see the big picture from foreground to background in clear focus, you must battle darkness. You have to solidly stabilize yourself in one position to avoid blur and be prepared to stay in one place for a long time.

Here's to Slackography. No 'point n'shoot' around here.

Robin

4/13/2010 11:22:00 AM  
Blogger f/zero said...

NB -

[techie on]

The fastest lens ever made was a Carl Zeiss 50mm f/0.7 - used appropriately by NASA. Can you say 'expensive'?

So just a minor technicality - replace the . with a / and you'd be right, as in f/4.

And about 50mm fast primes - yes, they are killer lenses. You can pick up a new Nikon 50mm f/1.8 lens for under a hundred bucks these days and it's mindblowingly sharp and accurate. An f/1.4 is a few hundred bucks more and an f/1.2 is more than I want to shell out. But wow.

Also the newest DSLRs have such outstanding low noise sensors that shooting at ISO 1600 or even 3200 is no longer verboten. Grainless low-light photography, here we com. Imagine.

[techie off]

4/13/2010 12:00:00 PM  
Blogger Rick said...

Wonderfull tri-beaut to mwah favwrite steam-powered photOgrappler!

Hip hip Toot!

4/13/2010 01:05:00 PM  
Blogger Tim said...

We all exist on several dimansions simultaneously. I saw my personal time dimension and noted well that it was considerably shorter than when I was a child. Gagdad do you believe we all have our own personal time dimension? Also this little revelation started when I was standing in line waiting for the short order cook to finish my eggs, the person behind me was impatient and squeezing me into my two dimensional existence, jeeez what nerve!

4/13/2010 03:02:00 PM  
Blogger f/zero said...

I think I scared all your readers away today, Bob. Sorry 'bout that!

I see I dropped an e around here someplace too. I've looked everywhere for it. If you run across it, drop it in any post box.

4/13/2010 05:00:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

I don't think so. Surprisingly, there's no real relationship between comments and blog hits. Plus, I disabled anonymous comments awhile back, in order to help him break his addiction to me...

4/13/2010 05:12:00 PM  
Blogger Tigtog said...

To Gagdad re:

"God pours himself into the cosmos in general and human beings in particular, and our task, if you will, is to return the favor by returning each moment to its rightful Owner."

Is this how we are connected to our ancestors and
progeny? Time is the glue in all its dimensions, particularly the 7D?

The horizontal and vertical form a cross. Each individual bears his own cross. Each individual chooses his own form of crucifixion (his personal testament of life, his choice of relationship with God). Is this a fair summation of your (Christ's) model for existence?

4/13/2010 05:54:00 PM  
Blogger julie said...

Dojo, I bet it's not that, it's just that when someone hits one out of the stratosphere (f'rinstance as happened right around 11:22), all one can do in response is sit quietly and marvel.

4/13/2010 06:00:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

"Is this a fair summation of your (Christ's) model for existence?"

I can't really answer that question. I'm trying to imagine what I could possibly say if someone asked me for a summation of my model of existence. In any event, since I try to stop actively thinking for the day after I've finished my post, you've caught me at a bad time!

4/13/2010 06:03:00 PM  
Blogger Joan of Argghh! said...

"If thine f/stop be single, then thy whole being is full of light."

Years ago it was explained to me that history is shaped as two triangles pointing toward each other. The past is focusing on One Moment and the future is emanating from that same, holy Moment.

To think of the eternal in that infinitesimal point of the parade of Time. . . is to fully give one's thoughts to the Slack. Better still to realize that History ended in that Moment and yet that Moment is with us always, moving at the speed of our sight.

4/13/2010 06:09:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

Addendum to post

Back in the late '70s I had a girlfriend who was a photographer. Naturally, I took up the hobby. But even then, I didn't really know what I was doing, hence my confusion about f-stops and apertures.

Leave it to Dupree. He just asked an inappropriate question about my girlfriend's aperture.

You don't want to know what he said about f-stops.

Stay classy, Dupree!

4/13/2010 06:14:00 PM  
Blogger Tigtog said...

To Gagdad re:

"I can't really answer that question. I'm trying to imagine what I could possibly say if someone asked me for a summation of my model of existence."

Poorly stated. I know your model is 2D as explained in your book. My gut wants to make it 3D because I am a nut for form and patterns. Its how I process things. I have this desire to see the processing of our choices of the vertical and horizontal become form in a 3D. The starkness of our choices crucified across just 2D is unsettling. But then crucifixion was a very humiliating and humbling event. Or should I say sobering.

4/13/2010 06:21:00 PM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

I don't think of myself as having a "model" anyway. Rather, I think I just express the timeless truths in an amusing way that our space-age-au go go society can relate to. If anything I say is truly new, it's probably wrong. There might be a couple of novelties in there, but I try to stay pretty close to the Primordial Doctrine.

4/13/2010 06:37:00 PM  
Blogger katzxy said...

"eternity is always -- and only -- accessible in the now"

Wow! Did that ever resonate.

Something about the expert hits the target other can't, but the genius hits the target others can't even see.

By the way, thanks.

4/13/2010 07:55:00 PM  
Blogger black hole said...

You have missions, people, so get on them.

You, Van, know what I'm talking about.

You, Julie, also.

Tigtog, you too.

Bob does not. The blog IS his mission.

I want you all to think about that.

Get back to me later. Think it over.

4/13/2010 10:59:00 PM  
Blogger black hole said...

Addendum: The missions include your spouses.

4/13/2010 11:01:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

"...the now is not strictly speaking in time, but is actually a "portion (or prolongation) of eternity," so to speak."

Appropriately, I'm catching up on yesterday and the day before, now, which would be this posts tomorrow, buy my today. Somehow it all seems to fit, especially keeping in mind that,

""the eye with which I see God is the same eye with which God sees me."

Say cheese.

4/14/2010 06:00:00 AM  
Blogger Martin McPhillips said...

This made me wonder, again, about the most seriously under-reported and under-noted and under-discussed and most amazing and current scientific theory. And that is Alan Guth's Cosmic Inflation, the prevailing theory of the Big Bang, in which the observable universe -- that's all the universe that can be "seen" by any means humans have available -- comes into existence in a trillionth of a second from something about the size of a proton.

The theory got a huge boost of verification a few years ago with the latest satellite probe of the cosmic microwave background radiation. The theory explains the uncanny evenness of thermal distribution throughout the universe.

4/14/2010 06:11:00 AM  
Blogger Van said...

Robin said "If on the other hand you prefer to see the big picture from foreground to background in clear focus, you must battle darkness. You have to solidly stabilize yourself in one position to avoid blur and be prepared to stay in one place for a long time.

Here's to Slackography. No 'point n'shoot' around here."

I really like that portrait.

4/14/2010 06:41:00 AM  
Blogger Van said...

Tigtog, maybe if you somehow took Joan's "...history is shaped as two triangles pointing toward each other. The past is focusing on One Moment and the future is emanating from that same, holy Moment...", and super-imposed (not sure how that f/stop works, but bet has something to do with it) it over ripples spreading out on a pond....

Or look at those ripples spreading out from a pebble tossed into a pond as an Eye not limited to our bandwidth would see it - ripples spreading out not only on the surface, but in spheres down into the pond, as well as waves into the air... might take quite a lens to capture all that though.

And what about the pebble?

4/14/2010 06:48:00 AM  
Blogger julie said...

Tigtog,

I hope you don't mind my responding with about .02 cents worth of opinion, given that your questions are directed toward Bob, but from where I'm sitting it seems as though maybe you're getting too caught up with trying to flesh out the model.

That is to say, the cosmos we can describe, no matter how many dimensions we may throw in (nor even how accurate they are), will still not be the cosmos. As with anything, there must be a point wherein the benefit gained from fleshing the model out too much will be subject to the law of diminishing returns. Also, given the subject matter the more detail one throws in heightens both the likelihood of error and the eventual possibility of mistaking the model for the reality.

Of course, my own personality tends to be more "play it by ear," so please take what I said above for what it's worth. Obviously, when it comes to verticalisthenics one size doesn't fit all.

That said, I thought your observations about the crucifixion were well made. Anybody serious about following Christ's lead and taking up their cross should be well-advised that the experience is likely to be as you described: humiliating, humbling and sobering. Dying to live is serious business, and the process strikes me as unlikely to be a respecter of personal preferences.

4/14/2010 07:24:00 AM  

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home