Sunday, March 18, 2007

Bloggin' on the Back Roads by the Rivers of My Memory (12.17.10)

"Just as the first day of creation in essence contains and encompasses the entire account of the creation, so does the seventh miracle of St. John's Gospel contain and encompass the other six miracles."

In Tomberg's analysis, he begins with the idea that sleep, death, and forgetting are all related to one another: just as sleep is the "younger brother of death," forgetting "is the younger brother of sleep." Forgetting is "a partial sleep of the conscious mind, while sleep is a complete forgetting of consciousness." To remember is to "resurrect" something from unconsciousness, while awakening from sleep is the remembrance of our conscious self. Each day we are miraculously "born again" through the sacred Raccoon ritual of the holy caffeinated water.

But just as life requires metabolism (building up) and catabolism (tearing down), our minds also require various kinds of forgetting in order to function. For example, in order to concentrate or to meditate, one must temporarily forget everything in consciousness except for the doing or non-doing at hand. If everything in your consciousness were simultaneously present -- if you had no forgettery to complement your memory -- you could accomplish little. Which reminds me of the scientist Francis Crick. In an interview, he was asked how he had managed to accomplish so much in his professional life. He responded that he had an advantage over other men because he was a "ninety percenter." That is, he only thought of sex 90% of the time, whereas most men do so 95% percent of the time.

The other day I read an intelligent comment by a poster on another site. I don't even remember the topic, but his point was that medicine is not a science but an art. Specifically, it is an art that utilizes and incorporates science, but nevertheless an art. I immediately related to this characterization, as I think it adequately summarizes the difference between, say, a Ken Wilber and me. I am not suggesting that my posts are works of art, only that the process of writing them is much more analogous to the way art is produced, in that I am essentially calling things up from the wider realm of consciousness as such, somewhat like a spider that spins an external production out of its own substance -- which it then inhabits.

We all do this -- that is, crawl around in the psychic webs we spend our lives spinning -- some of us more consciously than others. But where does the material for the web come from? As ShrinkWrapped has noted on many occasions, the most naive and clueless people are those who believe that their minds are completely rational, and that their psychic webs are spun out of "pure reason." Such individuals -- there's a particularly annoying one who frequently posts on Dr. Sanity -- tend to be rather tedious and shallow, as they are alienated from the larger and most vital part of their being. They tend to be on the obsessive-compulsive end of the spectrum, holding tightly to their little spotlight that is fixed upon a small area of darkness, instead of the vast -- even infinite -- interior cosmos that extends beyond the range of the spotlight, both "up" (into supra-sensory realms) and "down" (into the unconscious).

One can also see how this type of obsessional thinking is analogous to one who "cannot die," for just as there is pathological forgetting (i.e., Alzeimer's), there is pathological remembering (i.e., scientism, rationalism, leftism, etc.). In both cases, a psychic death occurs: the Alzeimer's patient because he cannot remember, the materialist or doctrinaire leftist because he cannot forget. Because as soon as you successfully forget that nonsense, your mind and your being will be "resurrected."

There is an inevtiable reason why conservatives and religious people are so much happier than leftists and irreligious people. They also live considerably longer, probably as a result of the deadly stress hormones produced by trying to live in a manner that is unnatural to -- and unworthy of -- human beings. In other words, just as human beings can only survive and flourish in a certain type of external environment (even if our technology is able to "recreate" that environment in hostile climes), they also only flourish spiritually and psychologically in a certain type of "interior environment" that facilitates vertical recollection of the soul -- "resurrection" again. You can pretend that what I am saying is untrue, but you're just pretending. You'll just create an exterior environment that props up and supports something less than your soul.

Science begins with the known (k) and tries to extend it into the unknown (O), whereas spirituality begins in the infinite unknown (O) and tries to "give voice" to it in a more or less structured way. Dogma and theology would represent more structured representations of O, whereas my bobservations would be less so. With respect to my posts, I do not know where they come from, as I am not logically thinking things through in any linear way as I write them. Rather, I simply abandon myself to the process of drawing things up in the order they arise. I am getting much better at simply typing things as they come down -- often without really knowing why -- and I frequently have to tell myself, "don't worry, just keep typing. You'll eventually find out what it means." This "waiting" for order and meaning is an important element of faith, which truly is the substance of things hoped for, but only if you don't prematurely foreclose your faith with easy answers. It also means that interest in my posts continues to wither away, but that's out of my hands.

In a way, the process is analogous to free association in psychoanalytic therapy. The first and last rule of psychoanalysis is to "disenable" your censor and to say whatever comes to mind, no matter how bizarre or trivial. By listening with "even hovering attention," a good analyst will be able to apprehend a deeper order that is governing the patient's associations -- perhaps even catch a mind parasite in flagrante delicto, which is always a thrill. With my posts, it's as if I am free associating, except "from above" rather than "below." As I continue associating, an order spontaneously emerges, but it is the same teleological order that was covertly guiding the process all along. The psychoanalyst Christopher Bollas (the most talented psychoanalytic writer qua writer I know of) calls it, "Giving up narrative control to become a certain sort of subject within a process guided by the intelligence of the other" -- or the (O)ther, as the case may be.

You might say that with the incarnation, the eternal Christic order went from being "implicate" to being "explicate," to employ the terms used by the quantum physicist David Bohm. The order was there as potential, but the human intermediary is required for it to "live," so to speak -- just as Mary was required in order for God's word to assume biological life. Obviously, it wasn't as if Christ did not exist prior to his incarnation, much less afterwards. But it was implicate existence -- "wave" rather than "particle," so to speak. The wave became particle for some 33 years, in so doing, roiling the waves of deep history. As I have mentioned before, those temporal waves continue to lap upon our distant shore, something which sounds strange but which is "obviously" true even to the most metaphysically blind and dense individual. Leftists would like to eliminate that particular wave from history, but the effort is as idle as trying to clamp down on the ocean to stop tsunamis. Good luck. The rest of us will just enjoy the metaphysical surfing.

Your very self is a chaotic attractor that abides in the future, drawing you toward it, but only if you abandon your own alternate plans for your existence. Bollas describes the self as an "inner sense of destiny" which "seeks lived experience to realise its own particular aesthetic intelligence." "We sense this drive to present and represent our self as if it were an intelligent life force" which reveals itself through the way we uniquely make use of the objects (and subjects) of life. For example, cut a page of Lileks' bleat, and it bleeds his blood. No one else could possibly use those particular objects and words in that particular way. His unique idiom is the exteriorization and realization of his equally unique self.

Now more than ever, because of the vast overabundance of infrahuman trivia and propaganda that surrounds us, it is necessary to live a life of systematic forgetting in order to remember -- and therefore resurrect -- "the one thing needful." Schuon was very, very adamant on this point, which can sound austere but is actually the doorway to liberation. In a letter to an initiate, he wrote, "The chief difficulty of the spiritual life is to maintain a simple, qualitative, heavenly position in a complex, quantitative, earthly setting." Only in so doing will we have the musical uppertuneity to hear the song celestial and discern between the Real and the illusory, which is the whole point of the spiritual life (that and a little thing called salvation). It is very difficult to remember the Real when one's very life is plunged into the unreal, with no space to breath in the ambiance of the Absolute and the Eternal.

This distinction between the Real and the illusory will determine how we use the only certainty given to humans aside from death, judgment, and eternity, which is the present moment, which ultimately determines the others. For the one moment given to us is the "liberating center" of the cosmos, into which eternity flows and death is therefore transcended. Alternatively, if we are tied with all our being to the relentless machine of time, it simply drags us along in its wake until we are ground down or torn apart. Lucky ones will simply smash into the wall of death without ever knowing what hit them -- which is to say, their life.

“Zoom!"

"What was that?"

"That was your life, mate."

"Oh, that was quick, do I get another?"

"Sorry mate, that's your lot."
--Interior dialogue of Basil Fawlty

Schuon sets out some simple guidelines for avoiding frittering away the moment, and therefore, your lot.

"One must not waste one's time with worldly, unnecessary and often trivial distractions."

"One must not regularly read a newspaper from one end to the other, above all in the morning."

"One must not habitually watch television."

"One must not read novels, profane, unhealthy, trivial literature" (although it is obviously permissible to inform oneself, to read books worthy of interest in historical, cultural, aesthetic, etc., subjects, but with measure and without losing oneself therein; and to enjoy art or music that is noble and which elevates).

"One must control one's curiosity."

"In short, one must live 'in a little garden of the Holy Virgin,' without unhealthy curiosity and without ever losing sight of the essential content and goal of life. That is 'holy poverty' or 'holy childlikeness'; it is also, so to speak, 'holy monotony'.... dominated by the proximity of the sacred, and on the margin from the uproar of this lower world.... This seems obvious, but most believers take no account of it."

Such a life is hardly monotonous in the way that word is typically understood, much less boring, but it is disciplined. I especially like the advice about "controlling curiosity," which is surely a vital component, for either you will control it or it will control you and drag you around by the eyes and ears. There are so many psychic avenues that one should not even take the first step down, but as soon as you say that, people think you're trying to diminish their freedom. Plus, the last thing people want is to have their conscience awakened, which is why Job One of the left is the annihilation of the personal conscience and its replacement with a collective one. This allows, for example, Hollywoodenheads to lead depraved lives while feeling morally superior to the rest of us because they voted for Al Gore's propaganda movie. This dynamic is the entire secret of leftist moral preening, and answers the perennial question, "how can such perverted people be so sanctimonious?"

Now, where were we? Yes, Lazarus. The miracle of drawing life from death. Don't worry, we're getting there, ye of little faith. One of the hazards of free association is that interesting little trails and byways will pop up along the journey. "Look! A squirrel!"

There's no hurry -- "to travel well is better than to arrive" anyway. And after all, free associations are free: you get what you pray for.

37 Comments:

Anonymous dilys said...

Thanks for the Bollas reference. "Giving up narrative control..."; I'd say our reflex tendency toward a death-grip on narrative control (not just sequence, but meaning) is a way to describe what Schuon's guidelines are about.

I'm just noticing at how many levels I am susceptible to the "ooooh, SHINY!" level of intellectual and psychological distraction. The modern world, including the blogosphere and the very air we breathe, makes a premium of that inner lifestyle of "More! What? Ooh! A free sample!"

It being Sunday, I'll say again, one advantage of a liturgy worth its salt is it
(1)tells me to, for the time being, put my mind on this; and (2) offers a Garden-like something that encompasses the mind and senses for just a little while. Of course, shiny squirrels are only a thought away.

Mind parasites in flagrante delicto, LOL. Is there any better version than Leonard Cohen's The Future:

"When they said REPENT REPENT
I wonder what they meant"

Really rich post!

3/18/2007 07:54:00 AM  
Anonymous shazbot said...

Bob, I order you to run for local office. Supervisor, mayor, something. Enter politics and leave the blogging behind. Your numbers are dropping because this movement into the real is waiting for you.

Carpe Diem

3/18/2007 09:20:00 AM  
Blogger Gagdad Bob said...

I'd rather drink muddy water and sleep in a hollow log.

Carpe Deus.

Or rather, vice versa.

3/18/2007 09:26:00 AM  
Anonymous debass said...

I think your posts are like jazz solos. You start out with a framework and a few ideas and try to connect them but sometimes better ideas (or not) take you in a different direction. Then you try to get back to where you were going and tie it into the main theme before the next solo begins ( or if it's a ballad, before the blender behind the bar starts up).

3/18/2007 10:16:00 AM  
Blogger juliec said...

"One must not read novels, profane, unhealthy, trivial literature"

Doh!

One of my greatest pleasures, up until recently, was reading trashy novels, aka "cheesy smut." I knew it was silly - the plots are generally terrible, the characters wooden, etc. etc., but it was like potato chips for the brain - once I started, I couldn't stop.

Funny though - lately, whenever I feel the urge to read something silly (especially as a break from the numerous very rich texts I've been trying, and sometimes failing to finish) I find that none of those books really hold my interest anymore, and I mean not even enough to fork over a few bucks at the used bookstore to see if I like them.

When I was in high school, I once spent a week at a Christian summer camp. It was tremendous fun, but the goal of the camp was of course not only to be fun, but to turn our youthful minds toward God. At the end of the week, we had a meeting during which many earnest young folk stood up and proclaimed that they had found Jesus or God. After listening to them speak, I knew my answer would be different, for of course God was always there, and "finding" Him isn't really very difficult if you're actually looking.

What I felt was more of a tap on the shoulder and a spiritual "Hey you - over here!" When I stood up, I turned it around, saying "This week God found me."

After a while, like many new young converts, I stopped paying attention, went to college, and became thoroughly turned around (incidentally, I didn't enjoy reading cheesy smut until I was in art school and a friend got me hooked...).

Coming here each day is like feeling that spiritual tap on the shoulder again, but this time with more lasting results. Like many here, as each day passes I find it easier (not perfect of course, I'm only human) to avoid "frittering away" the moment.

3/18/2007 11:28:00 AM  
Anonymous cousin dupree said...

My righteous troll-slappin' tuneage of the day: Long Ryders.

3/18/2007 11:54:00 AM  
Anonymous cousin dupree said...

Yesterday's troll-slapper.

PS--Dear Leader can dance just like those pips. When he feels like it.

3/18/2007 12:06:00 PM  
Blogger Kelly said...

Medicine-as-art was 3Case at Belmont Club re Post-normal science, fwiw.

3/18/2007 12:27:00 PM  
Anonymous hoarhey said...

Funny how when I have a question for Bob on a technique of doing something, such as becoming "unsaturated" the answer usually comes in a matter of days without even asking.
Among other clues is:

"One must not waste one's time with worldly, unnecessary and often trivial distractions."


Bob wrote,
"Which reminds me of the scientist Francis Crick. In an interview, he was asked how he had managed to accomplish so much in his professional life. He responded that he had an advantage over other men because he was a "ninety percenter." That is, he only thought of sex 90% of the time, whereas most men do so 95% percent of the time."

Thankfully this mindlessly wandering vacation is coming to a close in a couple days because I'm up to about 99.999999%. The other .000001% is spent foraging for food. Talk about saturation, it'll be a relief to ratchet it back down to 95%.

3/18/2007 01:14:00 PM  
Anonymous Aquila said...

Cousin D,

Boy, that Long Ryders clip brought back memories. I used to see them play all the time during the "Paisley Underground" days of the mid-80s, and once played a drunken softball game with the band members at the BOMP! Magazine annual picnic. Yet another great band that never really "made it"; I often wonder what music would look like today if they, and not, say, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, had grabbed the brass ring of Eighties LA underground rock.

3/18/2007 01:53:00 PM  
Anonymous walt said...

Today's post is worthy of serious comments, but I'll be honest, it touches on so many vital ideas that I remain a little overwhelmed even now, in mid-afternoon. I wonder whether what you experience as "withering interest" on your end, might be folks feeling a kind of "shock and awe" on the reader side? For instance, I printed-out this post, and highlighted seven groups of ideas especially interesting to me - of course, there were many more, overall. Where to begin?? No complaint here: OUR interest is alive and growing!

Your post may have contained a hint about your conundrum: Schuon, in reference to living "in a little garden of the Holy Virgin" said "This seems obvious, but most believers take no account of it."
He noticed his numbers were dropping? (I doubt he ran for local office....)

3/18/2007 02:19:00 PM  
Anonymous will said...

>>I frequently have to tell myself, "don't worry, just keep typing. You'll eventually find out what it means." <<

For me, the key phrase is "don't worry." Some worry is probably unavoidable, but excessive worrying is, I think, akin to excessive curiosity - in fact, worry is the insane uncle of curiosity. Roof brain chatter at its worst.

>>It also means that interest in my posts continues to wither away, but that's out of my hands.<<

Ah, please think of it as an alchemical winnowing down to divine essence.

>>Each day we are miraculously "born again" through the sacred Raccoon ritual of the holy caffeinated water.<<

Green tea here.

3/18/2007 03:35:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

"Each day we are miraculously "born again" through the sacred Raccoon ritual of the holy caffeinated water"

'Coon, Ra Coon. I'll have a Coffee, black, percolated not stirred'

(and sipped far away from the One Cosmos screen)

3/18/2007 03:45:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

Will said "... in fact, worry is the insane uncle of curiosity."

Deeply vertical LOL's.

3/18/2007 03:47:00 PM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

Yes, I'm with Schoun on this one.

By the way, hearing the sermon at my Church today and reading In The Face of the Absolute has led me to grok that the schism in the church relates completely and precisely to the treatment of Mother Mary.

Christ (as God) is Father (and shows us the Father) and the Church is (in a sense) mother. Which, uh, makes sense since it is Christ's bride.

Well, that's the raw idea as it came down the prisemantic splitstream of my coonsciousness.

(puts a bawl on a tea.) Ore!

3/18/2007 05:04:00 PM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

Atma breathes out Maya, Atma is spirit, we are united in spirit, we have the same Christ, Maya is misunderstood; we are of different mothers. It is no wonder we squabble like the Children of Solomon and David.

Yes- there's the analogy. We need to have the same mother- one mother and one father- we are like the sons and daughters of a polygamous king- or rather, that is the way in which we behave.

It is as though Mary is ONLY divine to the Catholic, and to the Protestant she is only human.

Curiouser and curiouser.

To the Gnostics: Wrong Mary!

3/18/2007 05:11:00 PM  
Blogger NoMo said...

Bringing the Real into as many moments as possible is what it's all about - whatever the circumstances.

Bob said, "It also means that interest in my posts continues to wither away, but that's out of my hands." Even if it appears that interest is no more than a mustard seed, mountains are moving, lives are transforming, light is reaching around corners you will never see. The level of interest here has no correlation to the the impact of the ideas you sow daily. If only you could see the myriad ways those ideas renew coonthoughtandaction. The calm before the storm...

3/18/2007 07:05:00 PM  
Anonymous ms. e said...

Fifteen, Maybe Sixteen Things to Worry About
by Judith Viorst

My pants could maybe fall down when I dive off the diving board.

My nose could maybe keep growing and never quit.

Miss Brearly could ask me to spell words like stomach and special.

(Stumick and speshul?)

I could play tag all day and always be "it."

Jay Spievack, who's fourteen feet tall, could want to fight me.

My mom and my dad--like Ted's--could want a divorce.

Miss Brearly could ask me a question about Afghanistan.

(Who's Afghanistan?)

Somebody maybe could make me ride a horse.

My mother could maybe decide that I needed more liver.

My dad could decide that I needed less TV.

Miss Brearly could say that I have to write script and stop printing.

(I'm better at printing.)

Chris could decide to stop being friends with me.


The world could maybe come to an end on next Tuesday.

The ceiling could maybe come crashing on my head.

I maybe could run out of things for me to worry about.

And then I'd have to do my homework instead.

3/18/2007 07:25:00 PM  
Anonymous cosanostradamus said...

"One must not habitually watch television."

As long as watching BSG is not a habit, but a 60 minute break in the 'holy monotony', then I can live with that.

3/18/2007 08:36:00 PM  
Blogger juliec said...

Or things with Historical value like Rome...

3/18/2007 08:59:00 PM  
Blogger NoMo said...

BSG
Rome
Deadwood
House
Dresden Files
24
Black Donnellys
Knights of Prosperity
My Name is Earl
The Office
Monk
And the guilty list goes on...
Woe is me!

3/18/2007 09:30:00 PM  
Anonymous emta said...

Yes, whither, whither will you go?
This troll remembers the time when your readers formed the most formidable cadre of verbal biters ever assembled in one electronic place. The word was ouch! Ego shredding!

Now I gambol, gambol, with impunity in the bobspace blogosphere. My how things have changed.

3/18/2007 09:44:00 PM  
Blogger Van said...

emta said "Now I gambol, gambol, with impunity".

yawn. Yes gamboling is all well and good and safe and easy... however when you feel up to gambling with a trollish thought or two (sorry, that whole counting upwards thing is always a problem for trolls - we'll leave it at just a single thought, strain enough for you in that), do let us know.

3/18/2007 10:10:00 PM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

Wow! Excellent Bob!
"Such a life is hardly monotonous in the way that word is typically understood, much less boring, but it is disciplined. I especially like the advice about "controlling curiosity," which is surely a vital component, for either you will control it or it will control you and drag you around by the eyes and ears."

Discipline actually provides more liberty to grow, whereas lack of discipline (being controlled by curiosity) enslaves while giving the "feeling" of freedom.

Does knowing evil ever help anyone grow? No, and gnoing evil is worse. That way lies a deeper death.

3/19/2007 04:54:00 AM  
Blogger Gaude said...

River, sweet boy,

Catholics don't believe Mary is divine. Worthy of more regard than all other humans, but not divine.
There's so much out there that folks think they know about dogma, but don't.

Which is why my first question is always "Tell me what you think Catholics believe about that."

Then they tell you, and they're almost always mistaken, usually critically so.

The Catechism on-line is such a blessing. It doesn't plumb the depths (ascend the vertical?), but it gets the facts out there. And no one has to take your word for it.

"And knowing is half the battle"
- G.I. Joe

(Sorry, weekend Barbie overload)

3/19/2007 04:55:00 AM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

Well, Schoun's advice can't be taken canonically, I think-- for instance, if a tax professional told you that you should buy a house because it will save you enormously on taxes, is that sufficient reason to buy a house?

I mean, the tax guy is right, the house will save you on taxes, but there are many more factors involved in whether you should get a house or not.

Likewise, Schoun says we shouldn't read fiction - as I recall, one of his ideas (or stances if you will) that he states is that culture in some ways 'makes us lose our taste for heaven.' (paraphrase...)

That should be, I think, a fair test for how a particular cultural item is interacting with you. If it consumes you, its gotta stop. Paul said: "All things are permissible, but not all things are beneficial... and I shall be subject to none."

So don't feel guilty for just being tempted .... Anyway, that's a decent list of shows. I wouldn't fault a man for watching Mythbusters or perhaps The Venture Brothers (but that's just me.)

If they've gotta go, you'll know.

3/19/2007 04:59:00 AM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

Will said:
"For me, the key phrase is "don't worry." Some worry is probably unavoidable, but excessive worrying is, I think, akin to excessive curiosity - in fact, worry is the insane uncle of curiosity. Roof brain chatter at its worst."

That's a keeper Will! Heh!

3/19/2007 05:00:00 AM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

Gaude: I assumed the reaction would be strong. Rather, I'm actually aware of that position (thanks for the condescension) but there is something indeed peculiar going on in their relationship to the Mother of God.

What I am saying is, my experience with Catholics has been due to the monolithic nature of the church there is an 'official stated position' which may or may not mean anything to its adherents but certainly serves to rebuke and chastise dissidents such as myself.

I've experienced several things that the church states aren't so (officially) and yet are so for many folks within.

Its hard work being infallible.

3/19/2007 05:05:00 AM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

Gaude said:
"Catholics don't believe Mary is divine. Worthy of more regard than all other humans, but not divine."

I concur Gaude. However, there are some Catholics who do.
Unfortunately the few that get it so wrong (be they Catholic or Protestant or Jew) always seem to make the news.

3/19/2007 05:08:00 AM  
Anonymous Sal said...

Nomo-
If you knew how to knit, you could watch with a clearer conscience, cause you would end up with a hat or socks or something useful.
Works for me, anyway.

I watched all of "Rome" on DVD while doing the handwork on the granddaughter's H'ween costume. Pagan excess, power lust and the lavender Fairy Princess.

A serious question, though, for us older Coons: have we heard all the stories? (I mean, aren't there only supposed to be about twelve? Eight?)
Is that why most movies today are so predictable and boring? And a lot of novels?

Oral surgery today. Say a prayer, think good thoughts. Thanks!

3/19/2007 05:09:00 AM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

Hoarhey said...
Funny how when I have a question for Bob on a technique of doing something, such as becoming "unsaturated" the answer usually comes in a matter of days without even asking.
Among other clues is:

"One must not waste one's time with worldly, unnecessary and often trivial distractions."

Good point Hoarhey.
Bob is the good unsaturated fat; the extra-virgin olive oil of the 'CoonO'sphere.

As opposed to the bad, saturated fat of the daily Kos, or Algore, the smogfather.

3/19/2007 05:15:00 AM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

Sal said...
Nomo-
If you knew how to knit, you could watch with a clearer conscience, cause you would end up with a hat or socks or something useful.
Works for me, anyway.

Baby blanket dispensation? :^)

Godspeed with the surgery Sal.
May it be painless and quick.

3/19/2007 05:22:00 AM  
Blogger USS Ben USN (Ret) said...

24?

Damnit Nomo, I don't have time for this!
Drop what your doing and set-up a perameter, and get that satO'llite on-line now!
Or, get Chloe to do it and knit me a new gun holster. :^)

3/19/2007 05:28:00 AM  
Blogger River Cocytus said...

The same can be said of the saints- I would not argue (As some protestants are wont to do) that they are literally false christs- (iconoclasty itself makes no sense to an artist anyhow) but rather that some ambiguity in doctrine allows for both positions (venerating saints, which is proper, and making them idols, which is improper.)

Needless, there is no point in going over the theological debate here, it has been said (and as they say, said well, before.)

My unusual notion, as it were, was simply that there is something about the doctrine concerning Mother Mary and the wholeness/lack thereof of the church. The concept that sticks out to me is that without a proper understanding or doctrine concerning her, no amount of wrangling with church politics (or temporal politics) will keep the church together. On one hand you will have a fragment breaking off, and on the other hand a pure splitting, like the division of a cell.

It isn't the doctrine that 'magically' produces these effects but rather, creates conditions to precipitate them. As much as I love my Catholic brethren, I find the greatest weakness of the Roman Catholic church is the papacy. Coincidentally, it is also one of its greatest strengths.

I think there is little coincidental between the troubles regarding the 'mother' church's unruly 'children', its positions about Mary, and its monolithic centralization.

But that is a mercilessly difficult topic among the orthodox, as even its discussion creates unsurmountable defensiveness - and rightly so, perhaps.

The way I see it, one should not argue with an orthodox Jew about Jesus.

So, apologies to any offended Roman Catholics.

3/19/2007 06:17:00 AM  
Anonymous Jacob C. said...

Sal: Lajos Egri said there's only thirty-six.

...what the hell does "eufazmz" mean? Never seen that particular variety of pseudo Greek before.

3/19/2007 10:50:00 PM  
Anonymous GM Roper said...

Excellent post Bob, I linked to it in Brief Politico-Therapies

3/23/2007 08:33:00 AM  
Blogger Bob said...

I especially like "to travel well is better than to arrive."

3/25/2007 09:32:00 PM  

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